Transition Time!

relay raceThe look of stress on the faces I pass says it (without words) all.

This last month before classes end, and ‘boards’ begin, is a trying time for most of our students.  Things have a way of piling up at the end of the semester, and (understandably) everyone tends to be a little more distracted and a little less available.

So, every May, we adjust our strategy.  Our meetings with students are less frequent and shorter.  We check in more through emails and texts: ‘How’s it going? How can we pray for you?’  And, with new leaders onboard, I work hard to set up meetings with them to strategize for the coming year, address any areas of concern, and help them establish their key priorities.

To give you a feel for how it works, I had an especially good meeting with the leaders from one of our dental campuses.  They’ve been extremely committed in re-launching the group during their first two years, but, understand their commitment next year will be more sporadic because of clinic, which involves seeing patients.  In addition, we will only have 1 leader next year who won’t be in clinic, but he has some other factors that may make it harder for him to ‘run point’ and lead the club.  All of this can feel overwhelming, and, make it challenging to continue the group’s recent success.

This is why I’m here!

Over lunch, I helped them develop a simple, but effective strategy:

  • reach out to first-years – they will be our future leaders and help the fellowship stay strong;
  • I will support the leader who’s not in clinic – so he has guidance and doesn’t have to ‘go it alone’;
  • keep meeting weekly – to provide continuity and much-needed refreshment, even during exams and seasons of busyness;
  • seek the support of the professor who’s been coming – although faculty can’t come frequently, their example of following Christ in the academy is irreplaceable.

It sounds simple – almost too simple, right?  It’s certainly true that this would not qualify as ‘rocket science’, but in the midst of schedules with precious little time, I feel privileged to help the students stay encouraged and take the small steps that will help them obtain God’s vision for their group.

Each campus leadership team’s needs are different, but real nonetheless.  As leaders stay focused on the Lord and His vision for their group, their fellowships thrive.  Thank you for making it possible for Sharon & I to support our leaders; together, we’re making a difference.

In Christ’s love,

Bryan & Sharon

Please join us in praise & prayer for the following items:

  • Praise for great leadership teams at our area campuses and the opportunity to speak into their lives.  Please pray that God gives all of us wisdom to discern His vision for each, and, the strength to live it out.
  • Pray that God gives the students strength to finish well academically, and, to keep growing in their love for Him.
  • Pray for our ministry team as we start to minister to medical residents (the stage in training just after medical school, but before becoming a full-fledged physician).
  • Finally, please pray that the Lord provides a reliable, cost-effective car for me as mine is, as they say, near the end of the road.

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Transition Time!

  1. Hey Byran! As a senior at my College Strayer University, I keep struggling to find time for exercise as I am glued to my computer both at home at at my campus in Center City, trying to keep an A average in my next to last quarter. Having trained and motivated, caring individuals who earnestly aim to assist students is quite a wonderful thing, and there were a few times that I was without assistance in a couple of my harder more intense classes. So, having someone like yourself who is there lending a helping hand is an especially marvelous resource which every graduate hopeful will surely appreciate and cherish. May The Good Lord Bless Your efforts and your household as well. …:)

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